Archive for the ‘Gifts’ Category

Take It Further – June Challenge

June 30, 2008

This month’s Take It Further Challenge involves our fabric stashes and the stories they could tell. Stories about what was and what could be. Looking at my stash often reminds me of where I purchased it, who was with me and what – if any- project I envision for it. There’s my collection of kiddie prints, acquired with an eye towards making my granddaughters quilts, toys and dresses, my collection of blacks and whites which include at least one B & W fat quarter purchased from any new-to-me quilt shop. Then there are my beloved batiks in a variety of prints and hues. They are the workhorses of my whole stash, good for everything from art quilts to bed quilts. There is also my small but growing stash of hand dyes in rainbow colors, destined to be a drunkard’s path and an Irish chain quilt. The crazy quilt fabrics compiled via stash swaps, Goodwill shopping and yard sales as well as internet shopping for dupioni silks, satins and velvets. There is also my stash of costume fabrics, things like lames, organzas, and sequined delights. I can’t forget about my art prints, these are fabrics that mimic the sky, the ocean, trees etc. Some are prints of these natural wonders, but many are batiks or fabrics that just remind me of something from nature, like the batik that I used for Ed’s salmon.

So that’s my stash inventory and it brings me to my special stash. I am the keeper of my mini-guild’s red, white and blue (RWB) stash. Last month Dorothy, Tamara, Lory, Karen, Lois and myself combined our RWB fabrics and met at my home to make a quilt for the American Hero Quilts (AHQ) group. (There is a link to them on the right hand side of my blog) The goal of AHQ is to provide all returning wounded veterans with a quilt to show our appreciation for their service. This is not a political group — some who make these quilts support the war and some do not support it. Making the quilts just means that we want to help the wounded veterans know we care about them.

Upon combining our RWB stashes we think we’ve got enough for at least 3 AHQs. Here is a picture of our first AHQ. It’s a work in progress. I need to make a few more blocks to finish the top. Tamara will quilt it on her long arm, then I’ll bind and wash it and send it off to Sue N. who’ll distribute it.

It’s a string quilt from a pattern provided by Mary Johnson of the Heartstrings Quilt Project.

Here is a picture of an AHQ that I made using stripped fabrics. I need to quilt and bind it as well.

The process of making these quilts yielded quilte a bit of very small scraps and selvages — perfect for the TIF challenge.

I decided to use these bits and pieces to make a flag. Here’s part of our large stash of RWB fabrics. and here’s a pic of the itty bits

I took a piece of fusible webbing cut like a waving flag and fused the RWB to it.

and here is is completed. It just needs a flagpole.

In conclusion, these RWB stash fabrics could be many things, a picnic cloth and napkins, a bandanna, a shirt, but we chose to create a quilt that we hope will wrap one returning veteran with love and appreciation.

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Father’s Day Gifts

June 2, 2008

I always have trouble finding just the right gift for my hubby, but this time I think I’ve found the ideal present. As a lifelong lover of the outdoors and avid fisherman how could he not like this salmon? It’s so easy to make and I fussy cut the batik fabric to mimic the shapes within the pattern. You can click on the photo to see what I mean. This is a www.quiltswithatwist.com pattern. I just traced the salmon onto fusible web, cut out all the designated pieces and then fused it to the black background fabric. My next step will be to do echo quilting and then make it into a pillow for him. This salmon is the second pattern I’ve made that Lisa Moore designed.

The first Quilts With a Twist pattern I attempted is her Orcas. Here is a picture of the Orcas that I need to quilt up and they will be ready to display. The Orcas have one extra step — the white fabric is cut and fused first, then the black is fused over that. This picture should clarify the process: